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OVITROPIN

HUMAN CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN 5000 IU

Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG) is a prescription medication containing chorionic gonadotropin obtained from a natural (human) origin. Chorionic gonadotropin is a polypeptide hormone normally found in the female body during the early months of pregnancy. It is synthesized in syncytiotrophoblast cells of the placenta, and is responsible for increasing the production of progesterone, a pregnancy-sustaining hormone. Chorionic gonadotropin is present in significant amounts only during pregnancy, and is used as an indicator of pregnancy by standard over-the-counter pregnancy test kits. Blood levels of chorionic gonadotropin become noticeable as early as seven days after ovulation, and rise evenly to a peak at approximately two to three months into gestation. After this point, the hormone level will drop gradually until the point of birth. Although it possesses minor FSH-like (Follicle Stimulating Hormone) activity, the physiological actions of chorionic gonadotropin mainly mimic those of the gonadotropin luteinizing hormone (LH). As a clinical drug, hCG is used as an exogenous form of LH. It is typically applied to support ovulation and pregnancy in women, most specifically those suffering from infertility due to low concentrations of gonadotropins and an inability to ovulate. Due to the ability of LH to stimulate the Leydig’s cells in the testes to manufacture testosterone, hCG is also used with men to treat hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, a disorder characterized by low testosterone levels and insufficient LH output. The drug is also used in the treatment of prepubertal cryptochidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles have failed to descend into the scrotum. HCG is used by male athletes for its ability to increase endogenous testosterone production, generally during, or at the conclusion of, a steroid cycle, when natural hormone production has been interrupted.

Human Chorionic Gonadotropin is generally given by intramuscular (IM) injection. The subcutaneous route is also used, and has been deemed to be roughly equivalent therapeutically to IM injections. Peak concentrations of chorionic gonadotropin occur approximately 6 hours after intramuscular injection, and 16 to 20 hours after subcutaneous injection.

Post-Cycle
Human Chorionic gonadotropin is often used with other medications as part of an in-depth Post Cycle Therapy (PCT) program focused on restoring endogenous testosterone production more rapidly at the end of a steroid cycle. Restoring endogenous testosterone production is a special concern at the conclusion of each cycle, a time when subnormal androgen levels (due to steroid induced suppression) could be very costly to the physique.The main concern is the action of cortisol, which in many ways is balanced out by the effect of androgens. Cortisol sends the opposite message to the muscles than testosterone, or to breakdown protein in the cell. Left unchecked by a low level of testosterone, cortisol can quickly strip much of your new muscle mass away. Protocols for the post-cycle use of hCG generally call for the administration of 2000-3000 Units every 2nd or 3rd day, taken for no longer than 2 or 3 weeks. If used for too long or at too high a dose, the drug may actually function to desensitize the Leydig’s cells to luteinizing hormone, further hindering a return to homeostasis. 

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